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Interim forest deal may give peace

THE long-awaited forest deal is now into its fourth extension, but an interim agreement that hinges on Forestry Tasmania modelling has been released by environment and timber group signatories.
Nanjing Night Net

The groups, following meetings with both state and federal government ministers, have now given themselves “four to six weeks” to cement a deal.

If it can be sealed they have not ruled out a trade delegation to overseas markets to collectively assure customers there will be “lasting peace” in Tasmanian forests.

They have also hinted at “incentives” to make sure neither side of the debate renews protest action or hostilities should an agreement be reached.

Forest Industries Association of Tasmania chief executive Terry Edwards declined to detail yesterday what either side had compromised since the most recent FT modelling showed wood supply and extra forest reservation objectives could not be met.

Mr Edwards said there was a clear expectation a deal could be finalised next month, with the next FT modelling to go “right down to the coup level”.

He declined to go into specifics about forest areas such as the Tarkine.

Mr Edwards said while cynics would undoubtably read the interim agreement as simply another extension, progress had been made on a number of fronts.

This included “durability” clauses such as grievance procedures and dispute mechanisms that would help bind both parties to a lasting resolution.

It remained unclear whether environment groups would be promised ongoing reservation in instalments if they could prove their international market campaigns had been abandoned.

The durability clauses would help prevent “people hanging off trees or hanging off machinery” in protest, Mr Edwards said.

Environment Tasmania spokesman Dr Phill Pullinger stopped short of saying whether his group, along with the Australian Conservation Foundation and Wilderness Society, would “denounce” radical protest groups if the international Tassie timber trashing campaigns resumed post any deal.

“This is not just about an agreement for today, it’s about a long-term partnership,” Dr Pullinger said.

Liberal forestry spokesman Peter Gutwein said the job- destroying agreement should be binned.

“We all know that peace will never be delivered,” Mr Gutwein said.

“This has gone on for two years.”

Key players in the forestry peace deal process at a media conference in Hobart yesterday are (from left) Britton Brothers director Glenn Britton, Forest Industries Association of Tasmania chief executive Terry Edwards and Environment Tasmania spokesman Phill Pullinger.

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Push for trade training school

WEST Coast Mayor Darryl Gerrity wants a trade training school to be established in the region.
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He says a training centre would give locals the best opportunity to gain employment in the area and stay with their families while also stimulating the local economy.

A centre would support locals in getting jobs in the industries the West Coast is so rich in, namely aquaculture, mining and tourism, he said.

Cr Gerrity said training was currently at an “all- time low”, and employment opportunities for locals were stifled, with much of the labour force outsourced to drive-in, drive-out workers.

“We would be able to train people in all aspects of mining, for example, to be employment ready,” he said.

“It’s so beneficial to the companies here to have home grown employees, the money stays in the community, and the employees live locally.”

Cr Gerrity said the Circular Head example of the Agritas Trade College was a prime example of a successful model.

Parliamentary Secretary for Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry Sid Sidebottom said he would be open to hearing more about the idea.

“The idea sounds good,” he said.

Minister for Education and Skills Nick McKim said discussions around the training needs of the West Coast were ongoing.

“The Department of Education has had some preliminary discussions with schools and local businesses on the West Coast to determine the training needs of the area,” he said.

“The West Coast Education Advisory Committee (WCEAC) has been developing and implementing strategies targeted towards the access, participation and retention of young people in education and training on the West Coast.”

The appointment of the new Education and Industry Partnership officer was one of the initiatives.

Darryl Gerrity

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These Cats are purring again

WYNYARD is no longer the NTFL’s walking wounded.
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Cats Zac Smith and Sam Gleeson will line up against East Devonport on Saturday, after both missed last weekend’s draw against Penguin with concussion.

Another five of Wynyard’s first-choice players are set to return from injury in next weekend’s final home and away round against Latrobe.

With the Swans hunting a finals berth, and the Demons desperate to finish on top of the ladder, Cats coach Shannon Bakes said the next fortnight would be the ultimate test for his returning players, heading into the finals.

“We know East Devonport will come to play this week and next week is even bigger, with top spot and a home final on the line,” Bakes said.

“We have no option but to bring these guys back now, but they have all played enough and trained enough to be up to speed.”

Cats in line to make their return against Latrobe include Cameron Betts, captain Daniel Franks, Clinton Stretton, Scott Matheson and Bakes, who admits he is a chance to play against the Swans.

While the six players will bring more than 500 games experience back into the side, Bakes said it was not a win-win situation.

“I have got such a headache over the next two weeks letting guys know they are not in the side.

“Some of the guys have played 30 games in the seniors over the last two years and they will be squeezed out.”

Another problem Bakes faces is finding balance over the ground.

“At the moment we are very tall down forward, then to throw Cameron Betts down there as well, I have to find how to shuffle it so it works,” Bakes said.

“One option might be to move (Gregg) Sharman back into defence, which frees up room for another crumber.

“It’s not ideal two weeks out from finals, but the guys are all pretty adaptable so hopefully it comes together.”

Zac Smith

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Southern backlash to West Park option

FOOTBALL fans in the south of the state have rubbished a proposal to bring the Tasmanian State League grand final to West Park.
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The Southerners’ gripes stem from the size and location of the Burnie Dockers’ home ground.

On one Hobart media outlet’s website, a critic went as far as suggesting they would: “rather watch 200 people at Aurora than 10,000 at West Park.”

They added: “David Rhys Jones got West Park right … a school ground in the middle of Bass Strait”.

Earlier this week AFL Tasmania amended a rule to allow North Hobart Oval to join Aurora Stadium and Blundstone Arena as possible host venues for the TSL decider.

On Tuesday, Burnie Sports and Events CEO Brett Whiteley told The Advocate West Park had every right to be included in the amendment.

However, that call seems to have fallen on deaf ears with fans in the state’s capital, with one contributor on the same Hobart- based website even suggesting Mother Nature was opposed to the idea.

“If it’s not raining at West Park it is blowing a gale … if Burnie is in the grand final it has to be played at Aurora (Stadium).”

Another Southerner questioned whether the ground’s amenities were up to hosting the TSL’s showpiece.

“Ideally Devonport would be the better of the two venues up there,” they said.

“The attendance figure would be a lot more there (at West Park) than Aurora, but the facilities aren’t much chop.”

Finding love for West Park among The Advocate’s readership also proved difficult.

On The Advocate website, Steven Harris wrote: “there are several good reasons (why West Park should not host the grand final) with the main one being the ground itself is a dump”.

However, a number of Coasters were willing to fly West Park’s flag, including Ian McGrail of Somerset, in a letter to the editor addressed to The Advocate.

“It seems the Hobart sooks are whining again about the chance they might have to play football finals on another ground other than down south or Aurora,” he said.

“This is a statewide league and the Burnie ground is good, not Devonport, not Launceston, but Burnie where we would get a huge crowd …something TSL finals is missing.”

Brett Whiteley

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Anti-abuse campaigner happy to spread word

STEVE Fisher has been campaigning against sexual abuse for years, and now he wants to spread the word about respect.
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The Devonport-based Beyond Abuse spokesman is hugely enthusiastic about The Advocate’s Show Some Respect campaign.

He aims to get the word out to his large network of contacts and hopes they will get their contacts involved as well.

“It’s one of those things I can’t support enough,” Mr Fisher said yesterday.

The campaign, which has received national exposure, grew from concern about abuse and assaults of teachers, police, hospital workers and emergency services personnel.

“I think no matter what happens in people’s lives, there’s no reason, especially for emergency services personnel, to be assaulted and so forth,” Mr Fisher said.

“I think it comes back to the way people are brought up and the values of society today.

“It’s something that needs looking at and changing.”

He said a public initiative like Show Some Respect was fantastic and would hopefully become a nationwide movement.

“It’s something that’s needed.

“I hope by doing this we can start to change community attitudes.

“I plan on letting everybody I come into contact with know what we’re trying to do and know what it’s all about, then encouraging them to use their networks and spread the word even further.”

The Show Some Respect pledge can be signed at The Advocate’s Devonport and Burnie offices, via the Show Some Respect Facebook page or via www.theadvocate南京夜网.au

Show Some Respect supports –

Greater empowerment of police to better deal with public order issues;

tougher sentencing, especially for serious assaults on emergency service workers; and

more funding for parenting and family programs to help deal with intergenerational issues.

Steve Fisher, from Beyond Abuse, signs the Show Some Respect pledge. Picture: Jason Hollister.

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Southern backlash to West Park option

FOOTBALL fans in the south of the state have rubbished a proposal to bring the Tasmanian State League grand final to West Park.
Nanjing Night Net

The Southerners’ gripes stem from the size and location of the Burnie Dockers’ home ground.

On one Hobart media outlet’s website, a critic went as far as suggesting they would: “rather watch 200 people at Aurora than 10,000 at West Park.”

They added: “David Rhys Jones got West Park right … a school ground in the middle of Bass Strait”.

Earlier this week AFL Tasmania amended a rule to allow North Hobart Oval to join Aurora Stadium and Blundstone Arena as possible host venues for the TSL decider.

On Tuesday, Burnie Sports and Events CEO Brett Whiteley told The Advocate West Park had every right to be included in the amendment.

However, that call seems to have fallen on deaf ears with fans in the state’s capital, with one contributor on the same Hobart- based website even suggesting Mother Nature was opposed to the idea.

“If it’s not raining at West Park it is blowing a gale … if Burnie is in the grand final it has to be played at Aurora (Stadium).”

Another Southerner questioned whether the ground’s amenities were up to hosting the TSL’s showpiece.

“Ideally Devonport would be the better of the two venues up there,” they said.

“The attendance figure would be a lot more there (at West Park) than Aurora, but the facilities aren’t much chop.”

Finding love for West Park among The Advocate’s readership also proved difficult.

On The Advocate website, Steven Harris wrote: “there are several good reasons (why West Park should not host the grand final) with the main one being the ground itself is a dump”.

However, a number of Coasters were willing to fly West Park’s flag, including Ian McGrail of Somerset, in a letter to the editor addressed to The Advocate.

“It seems the Hobart sooks are whining again about the chance they might have to play football finals on another ground other than down south or Aurora,” he said.

“This is a statewide league and the Burnie ground is good, not Devonport, not Launceston, but Burnie where we would get a huge crowd …something TSL finals is missing.”

Brett Whiteley

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Emotional and physical disaster recovery takes time

“IT’S a marathon, not a sprint.”
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This was one of the key themes of a presentation delivered yesterday by Red Cross national recovery coordinator Kate Brady as she spoke about the lengthy aftermath of disasters.

Ms Brady was addressing emergency services and regional social recovery members at the presentation, which coincided with the North-West Regional Emergency Management Conference at The Point at West Park.

Ms Brady has visited and studied the recovery efforts and anniversaries for such disasters as September 11, the London bombings and the Columbine shootings.

She knows all too well that the lasting effects, both physical and emotional, can be a massive factor in the overall wellbeing of the place where the disaster has occurred.

“The main message is to remember to stay connected to each other and make people feel good about themselves, and to look out for friends and family,” she said.

Ms Brady said, in her experiences, one of the constants of disasters was that people were questioning themselves, their relationships and their sense of purpose.

“It takes a really long time (to get back to normality),” she said.

“It really is a marathon and not a sprint.”

Ms Brady said it was hard to prepare for a disaster, as no-one realistically expected it would happen to them.

“For just about everybody, they never think something like this will happen to them,” she said.

Ms Brady said communities could only prepare as best they could for a potential disaster.

“All they can do is be prepared, know the hazards in the area and know their nieghbours,” she said.

SES North-West regional manager Wayne Richards said it was beneficial for his members to hear from Ms Brady.

Red Cross national recovery coordinator Kate Brady speaks in Burnie yesterday. Picture: Grant Wells.

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A crash-test cow in action

SAFERGATE, a new type of farm gate, has been pushed to the limits by a CSIRO-developed “crash- test cow”.
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Farmer and inventor Edwards Evans, who designed SaferGate, had his own leg broken when operating a cattle gate on his farm.

The new type of cattle gate is aimed at preventing farmer death and injury has been rigorously tested and developed by the CSIRO.

Unlike a traditional cattle gate, it swings away from the farmer or operator when a cow charges it, preventing death or injury.

This is achieved by a pivot mechanism that splits the gate in two pieces when hit, which allows the part of the gate in front of the operator to fold back on itself and away from them.

This is welcome news for the farming community with hundreds of farmers and cattle handlers injured each year in Australia operating cattle gates.

Last year Mr Evans won the ABC’s New Inventors grand final and was awarded ,000 worth of research and development of the SaferGate by CSIRO.

CSIRO took the original design and improved it by adding a magnet on the gate hinge, which allows the gate to remain in a steady position until hit.

Mr Evans said the improvements meant it was even safer and easier to operate on foot or on horseback.

“I hope to see it helping to improve the safety of Australia’s farmers and cattle gate operators very soon,” Mr Evans said.

The CSIRO research team focus has been on simplifying the gate’s operation, optimising safety and ensuring that all parts and mechanisms on the gate can be easily maintained when exposed to harsh weather conditions.

Research project leader Peter Westgate said never before had the CSIRO been asked to test the performance of a cattle gate.

“Our bread and butter is industrial fine materials and building testing, but knowing how big an issue safety is for farmers and operators made this project as rewarding as it was challenging,” Mr Westgate said.

The tests have shown that the harder and faster the gate is hit, the better it performs.

“Even though the tests use a 60kg “cow” compared to a real life 1000kg cow, the result is the same,” he said.

SafeGate general manger Mike Agnew said he hoped to market the gate in Australia within the next six months. Go to www.theadvocate南京夜网.au to see the video of the “crash test cow” in action.

CSIRO scientist Peter Westgate releases the crash-test cow.

CSIRO scientist Peter Westgate releases the crash-test cow.

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Anti-abuse campaigner happy to spread word

STEVE Fisher has been campaigning against sexual abuse for years, and now he wants to spread the word about respect.
Nanjing Night Net

The Devonport-based Beyond Abuse spokesman is hugely enthusiastic about The Advocate’s Show Some Respect campaign.

He aims to get the word out to his large network of contacts and hopes they will get their contacts involved as well.

“It’s one of those things I can’t support enough,” Mr Fisher said yesterday.

The campaign, which has received national exposure, grew from concern about abuse and assaults of teachers, police, hospital workers and emergency services personnel.

“I think no matter what happens in people’s lives, there’s no reason, especially for emergency services personnel, to be assaulted and so forth,” Mr Fisher said.

“I think it comes back to the way people are brought up and the values of society today.

“It’s something that needs looking at and changing.”

He said a public initiative like Show Some Respect was fantastic and would hopefully become a nationwide movement.

“It’s something that’s needed.

“I hope by doing this we can start to change community attitudes.

“I plan on letting everybody I come into contact with know what we’re trying to do and know what it’s all about, then encouraging them to use their networks and spread the word even further.”

The Show Some Respect pledge can be signed at The Advocate’s Devonport and Burnie offices, via the Show Some Respect Facebook page or via www.theadvocate南京夜网.au

Show Some Respect supports –

Greater empowerment of police to better deal with public order issues;

tougher sentencing, especially for serious assaults on emergency service workers; and

more funding for parenting and family programs to help deal with intergenerational issues.

Steve Fisher, from Beyond Abuse, signs the Show Some Respect pledge. Picture: Jason Hollister.

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‘Unfinished business’ a lure for Jackson

Almost three weeks after calling his boxing career quits in London, Glenorchy fighter Luke Jackson is reconsidering his status in order to settle “unfinished business”.
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The 27-year-old boxer returned to Hobart yesterday after an unsuccessful Olympic campaign, alongside Kookaburra Eddie Ockenden and several Tasmanian rowers.

In his first Olympic Games bout, Jackson lost 20-7 to China’s Liu Qiang in the men’s light (60 kilogram) division – retiring immediately afterwards.

However, after serious deliberation and consultation with his family and coaches, the four-time national champion and 2006 Commonwealth Games bronze medallist was considering giving it one more crack.

“It was always on the cards to retire from boxing after the Olympics before I went over, that was the plan and after the fight I did, but a couple of days later I felt like I still had the bug in me that I wanted to keep training and fighting,” Jackson said.

“I am going to talk to my girlfriend and my father and see where we go from here.

“It is not easy. It is still in me and I definitely know I do want to fight again, I just didn’t perform to the best of my ability in London and I’m still not sure what went wrong.”

Jackson said he felt that he could still perform at a high level and earmarked the world championships and the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow as potential targets.

“The fight in London was terrible compared with what I know that I am capable of, but obviously I need my family’s support and want them to back me 100 per cent,” he said.

“I don’t think there has ever been an Australian boxer that has been to three Commonwealth Games so – something’s on the cards.”

Luke Jackson (right) lost in the first round of the Olympics to China’s Liu Qiang.

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